Queen of the May

Just like Molly dancing, our May queen was organised and performed by a fluid group of girls who played together in the street. It has little connection to organised events featuring Rose queens or intricate Maypole dancing, but it was a good excuse to dress up.

In the 1950s, fancy dress hire was unimaginable. Thankfully crepe paper was amazingly strong and versatile, if not actually colour fast in a sudden downpour.

The money earned by Molly dancing provided the wherewithal to ensure we were well turned out, but it was the older girls who passed on the May queen ’knowledge’ year by year.

The first of several decisions to be made was the choice of queen. Anyone in possession of a long dress was an automatic contender. That’s how I came to be queen in 1952. The previous year, tricked out in blue georgette, elbow length lace gloves and ringlets, I was my auntie’s bridesmaid at St. John’s, Ashley Lane.

The next important choice was the May queen’s attendants. Their duty was to hold the decorated garf (or garth) over the queen as she waited expectantly at each front door. A garf was a half circular hoop of anything that could be decorated with crepe paper flowers.

With the exception of the queen, everybody else would be dressed in a paper pinafore type garment with matching headgear. The final decision was which two colours would form that year’s theme. Some flexibility was necessary as it was possible the newsagent’s might not have enough crepe paper in either colour to satisfy our needs.

It was the older girls who did the cutting out, but we all had to sew our own outfits.

The main colour was used for the skirt section and the heart-shaped top of the pinafore. Colour 2 was cut into 3 or 4 inch wide strips for apron ties and the rosette style caps held on with hair clips. Some of the secondary colour was gathered into a frill and sewn around the heart shape bodice.

The Maypole consisted of a brush stale (broom handle) wrapped in some of the remaining crepe paper with the required number of ‘ribbons’ attached. It was usually the tallest girl who carried the Maypole while the rest held onto the streamers.

The favourite and most artistic task was sculpting the crepe paper into flower petals to be attached to the garf.

By the 1st of May, we were all set. The girls with the Maypole stood poised while the queen and her entourage approached each front door and knocked…

Crepe paper doesn’t stand up to being threaded and plaited like a real Maypole, so no actual dancing took place. To make up for the static nature of our display, we sang instead:-

Around the merry maypole, and all the live long day,

We crown you [first and surname of the queen], we crown you queen of May.”

We sang several variations on the theme, but I’m sorry to say I have
forgotten the others.

Our reward for the efforts put into Molly and Maypole dancing was a ‘garden’ party. That is to say, a kitchen table covered with a cloth was set up in someone’s back garden.

The pennies and halfpennies collected by us bought the ingredients for the feast, and our mothers prepared it. Most foodstuffs were off ration by that time, so we were able to enjoy as many sandwiches, jellies and fancy cakes as our funds would stretch to.

We played games until it went dark, and I don’t remember a single occasion when our celebrations were rained off.

It’s 67 years since my debut as May queen, and I still remember it as one of the highpoints of my childhood.Modern day May Queen’s preparing for a ceremony in Failsworth in 2018

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Moviecals – North West Theatre Arts Company at its best

It’s a treat going to the theatre and I sensed we were in for something special. I told my husband so…and I’m never wrong.

As we settle into our seats and the lights go down the usual announcement is made saying the performance is about to start. “Switch off your phone, no flash photography and enjoy the show…”, etc.

My husband whispers “Jesus! You didn’t tell me Idris Elba was going to be here.” You can imagine my expression. I think he’s serious but you can never tell.

I shake my head and study the playbill. Moviecals is a showcase of hit songs and dance routines from the movies covering a range of genres; from the comforting lullaby “Hush-A-Bye Mountain” (sung by Owen Maudsley) to the seductive “Cabaret” (Eva Carty), the cheeky number “Pick A Pocket” (Liam Watson), melancholy “Tomorrow” from Bugsy Malone (Poppy Evans) to the inspirational “This is Me” (full company).

It’s a preview evening. We’re privileged to be here. I’m excited but nervous knowing this is the first time the show would run in front of a live audience. Tension is in the air. I hold my breath for the first few minutes and feel nervous for everyone, front stage and back. So much responsibility.

But….they were fantastic! We were treated to full on dance routines that make you think you can dance too and songs that ring in your head for days. It was uplifting, emotional and magical.

Comedy didn’t get left out either. The links between numbers were covered brilliantly by Laurel and Hardy aka the multi-talented James Valentine and Jonny Molyneux – hilarious. Steve Cougan and John C Reilly watch your backs, these two were an absolute treat.

Jonny’s rendition of “If I Were a Rich Man” was also outstanding. Both he and James had us in stitches.

If you’ve ever been on a Disneyland theme park ride this was just the same except it stopped off at the West End and Warner Bros on the way round. I wanted to climb off and join in.

Across the 44 songs and routines covered, there was a chance for everyone to take centre stage and shine. We thoroughly enjoyed every minute.

The curtain came down as mist from dry ice filtered through the emptying seats. We drifted into the bar area and passed by the technicians whose lighting, sound and stage management skills helped bring it all together.

In the bar, front of house positions were held by students of the theatre’s stage school playing their part in making it an all-round special experience.

I applaud you all.

Was Idris Elba there? No, was he hell as like! He too should watch his back though. Apparently, my husband reckons, Prab Singh (Director…and announcer) sounds just like him.

For information about NWTAC including What’s On, booking tickets, North West Stage School and more, click here.

There may still be tickets left for Moviecals but, if you’ve missed out, sign up for their mailing list.

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Nature’s all around us

Wasn’t Easter Weekend fabulous! Glorious sunny seaside weather. Who’d have thought a few days after going for a paddle you’d need a paddle just to get about.

On Friday 26th April I stood in the car park next to the Moston Fairway Nature Reserve wondering what on earth I was doing there. It was bucketing down, blowing a gale and freezing cold.The group, believe it or not there were others, were wellied and sporting water proofs and seemed oblivious to the rain. We huddled around while Martyn Walker, the man in the know about plants, like this guy really knew his ribworts from his ramsons, gave us a bit of history about the reserve. It was once a busy and industrious railway siding but is now transformed into an inner city haven for wildlife.Martyn doing his stuff

Hilary Wood, from the Lancashire Wildlife Trust, thanked us all for turning out on such an inclement afternoon. Then we set off down the path heading for the marsh area of the reserve first.

I should explain why we were there; it wasn’t just for the fresh air. We were taking part in a Global, that’s all the world, City Nature Challenge; competing to make as many observations of nature and find the most species.

To be fair, I’m clueless. I know the difference between a rose and rodent but I can’t remember the names of my fellow humans never mind rare plants.

We’d been asked to download an app onto our mobile phones beforehand. A young lady from the trust helped me out and explained the obvious. Easy – you find a plant, bug, bird, butterfly etc., get close, choose ‘new photo’, aim and click. The app saves the picture, helps match it to a species and pinpoints the location – techno magic!

… and I was off. A dodgy leg (I broke it last year) left me keeping to stable ground so when the group wandered onto the marsh I kept to the path. Two hours flew by, the wind and rain kept coming but we hardly noticed.Moston Fairway Nature Reserve is a naturalist haven.  A mixture of grassland, marsh and woodland, with a diverse range of plant and animal life. It’s unique in Manchester and therefore very special. It forms part of the Moston Brook Corridor; four areas of green space right on our doorstep. Open all year round and free.

At home, my soaking clothes went straight into the washing machine and, hot brew in hand, I got clued up about the City Nature Challenge. This quote from their website sums it up…

There is nature all around us, even in our cities! Knowing what species are in our city and where they are helps us study and protect them, but the ONLY way to do that is by all of us – scientists, land managers, and the community – working together to find and document the nature in our area.

By participating in the City Nature Challenge, not only do you learn more about your local nature, but you can also make your city a better place – for you and other species! 

The challenge takes place over 4 days. I was totally hooked on the iNaturalist app anyway so I carried on taking snaps all weekend and the weather even picked up.My favourite shot…

If you missed the event, don’t worry, you can take part in Lancashire Wildlife’s Trust brand new initiative “My Wild City – reconnecting people and wildlife in Manchester”. Click here for the details and have your say.

Also, feel free to take a look at the iNaturalist webpage for other projects.

Or just take a stroll around Moston Brook Green Corridor, relax and enjoy the space. Up-coming events around the brook can be found on their Facebook friends page.

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